Archive for the 'Butchering Day' Category

Butchering comes to an end

With the laid out the cool, the lard rendered, the lean meat made into sausage, and the head meat made into sausage, and the head made into cultural dishes, the family finished the long butchering day.  By the end of the day, the entire family was literally and physically exhausted from work, play and long [...]

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Sausage Making

At the same time that some men rendered the lard, others made sausage from the tub full of trimmed meat.  The trimmed meat for sausage came from the farmer trimming such meat as the hams.  Trimming left a shapelier and cleaner cut ham.  If the “master trimmer” made the trimmings into sausage, they were worth [...]

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Lard Rendering

While the meat was left to chill, the farmer rendered the lard.  This process required considerable amount of time—approximately three hours.  Lard rendering was another on of those butchering skills which many said they learned from watching.  One said, “It wouldn’t be possible to learn it from written directions.”  The farmer rendered lard because he [...]

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Chilling the meat

While the women cleaned the intestines and prepared the head other variety meats, the men readied the carcass for chilling.  Chilling was the procedure where the farmer gradually allowed the natural animal heat to leave the carcass.  The meat was chilled by keeping it for a day at a temperature just slightly above freezing.  Since [...]

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Head Cheese Making

After the women had cleaned the intestines and stomach, they returned to the house and cooked the meat for several hours in a large black kettle on the kitchen stove, or some even used the large “meagrope.”  To the cooking head meat they added such items as the cleaned tongue, brains, pancreas, heart, liver, feet, [...]

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Intestine Cleaning

The farmer did not put the intestines into the cold water with other internal organs.  Instead the intestines were prepared first, because they could be cleaned easier while they were still warm from the hog’s body heat.  Intestines cleaning was basically a women’s job, but George Stromberg, Jr. claimed he cleaned many miles of them, [...]

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Intestine Removal

After the farmer or “master dresser” cleaned the carcass and removed the head, skillfully slashed the carcass with a knife and gutted it. This was a very delicate procedure. Extreme caution was used in opening the stomach cavity. The belly of the hog was swept open from the tail to the spot on the hog’s [...]

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Head Removal

After the hair removal process-either by skinning or scalding, the farmer readied the carcass for the removal of the intestine.  He spread the hog’s back legs just over a foot apart and re-inserted the single tree into the same slots as he used earlier for scalding or skinning the hog.  The carcass was held up [...]

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Skinning

19.&20.  David Krause, Roger VanMeter, and Levi Prieb 1972 bog butchering with the skinning method, and the use of hydraulic lifts.  Lehigh, Kansas Up until the last thirty years many of these early ethnic groups and their descendants in Kansas used this scalding-scraping procedure.  They used it in order to obtain the rind for their [...]

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Scraping

After the scalding process the farmer pulled the hog from the scalding vat, removed it from the hoist and single tree, and placed it on scraping table.  The table was made from heavy planks or an or door placed over barrels or saw horses.  Next the hog’s hair was removed with great speed with a [...]

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